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The ritual of mint tea in Morocco

The preparation of tea in Morocco is a tradition that dates back to the 12th century BC. The theories on the origin of this drink are different, it seems that it was the Berbers who imported the tea from Asia, or that it was Queen Anne Stuard of Great Britain who introduced the drink, serving it to the Moroccan sultan as a ploy to free the British prisoners.

The ritual of mint tea in Morocco
The preparation of mint tea in Morocco is a tradition that dates back to the 12th century BC. The theories on the origin of this drink are different, it seems that it was the Berbers who imported the tea from Asia, or that it was Queen Anne Stuard of Great Britain who introduced the drink, serving it to the Moroccan sultan as a ploy to free the British prisoners.

Mint tea from Morocco

Each cup of Moroccan tea contains three main ingredients: tea leaves, the Gunpowder variety, sugar and spearmint.
Despite the disproportionate use of mint tea, the plant is not grown in Morocco, but the raw material is imported from China.
Although it is an equivalent of green tea, it has a stronger flavor, when mixed with fresh mint, the smoky taste of the gunpowder gives the tea a unique flavor.
To enhance the flavor of the tea Moroccans use sugar, the flavor tends to be pungent and stronger.
The third ingredient is spearmint, which due to its pungent and delicate aroma is the traditional choice in the preparation of tea.

The ritual of mint tea in Morocco

One of the pillars of Moroccan culture is Moroccan mint tea, also known as "Berber whiskey" or "Maghreb mint tea". The drink is sipped at all hours of the day and in particular situations such as, for example, when welcoming guests into the house, when celebrating a wedding ceremony, a birth or a funeral or when sharing meals together: in Morocco in tea is sipped 20 or even 30 times throughout the day.
Refusing to drink a cup of tea is considered a rudeness and a cultural taboo, because preparing a cup of tea in Morocco does not only mean boiling water and adding mint leaves, but represents a ceremonial art that is handed down generation after generation.
The ritual of tea at sunset in the desert dunes of Essaouira is famous, necessary to gather strength, admire the naturalistic beauties and enjoy moments of serenity.

Moroccan teapot

To prepare a good mint tea you need to have the traditional Moroccan teapot, because unlike a common ceramic teapot, the Moroccan one resists high temperatures, in direct contact with the heat of the stove for a few minutes.
The teapot must not have feet, but it must have a flat base to be compatible with most types of stoves. The handcrafted teapots are heavy and strong, with precise and beautiful engravings, they cost more but last a lifetime.

Tea preparation

To prepare the tea, you need to put two teaspoons of gunpowder in a traditional teapot. Add a handful of fresh mint tea and aromatic herbs of your choice with a sugar.
Boiling water is poured into the teapot to heat the inside and then left on the fire with sugar and herbs for a few minutes. Then you have to remove the liquid from the teapot and pour it into a glass.
You add boiling water back into the teapot for a second rinse, this process is to remove the bitterness of the tea. This water should be discarded and used only the first extraction that has been set aside.
To mix all the ingredients, take the first glass of water, pour it into the teapot and then pour it back into the glass, and then pass it back into the teapot, this procedure must be repeated two or three times to obtain a good Moroccan tea. The mixture should never be mixed with a teaspoon so as not to burn the herbs.


Moroccan cups

The Moroccan mugs are made of glass, embellished with beautiful colorful decorations. The cups are small because in Morocco there is a habit of sipping tea in small quantities, even in drinking it a ritual is followed. Tea must be savored, tasted and every moment consumed must represent a cuddle, for oneself and also for the guests.

Arabic tea

Arabic tea contributes to good health. In Morocco, where temperatures are high, hot tea is drunk even in summer, because the consumption of hot drinks cools the body, plus Arab tea has many antioxidant ingredients that are able to increase physical stamina, help digestion, inhibit the growth of bacteria and fungi.
Then there are aromatic plants with healing properties, such as thyme, a wormer that helps eliminate bad bacteria, strengthens the intestinal lining and reduces inflammation.
Otherwise, to give the tea a floral taste, there are those who add geranium which has relaxing properties, lemon verbena instead gives a feeling of freshness.
Some aromatic plants that are added to Moroccan mint tea are dried flowers, such as rose petals, otherwise to enrich the herbal tea with a fruity aroma, lemon peel, orange blossom water or the peel are added directly. orange.
The ritual of mint tea in Morocco
The ritual of mint tea in Morocco
The ritual of mint tea in Morocco
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